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Sports Academy Directors' Cups to be Presented to Stanford, Grand Valley State, Williams and Azusa Pacific

June 17, 2005

Lake Buena Vista, Florida -- The Sports Academy Directors' Cups, presented annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA), United States Sports Academy and USA TODAY to the best overall collegiate athletics programs in the country, were awarded today to the nation's top collegiate athletics programs in NCAA Divisions I, II and III and the NAIA. The awards were presented at the NACDA Convention in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.

This year's winners are Stanford University (Div. I), Grand Valley State University [Mich.] (Div. II), Williams College [Mass.] (Div. III) and Azusa Pacific University [Calif.] (NAIA). Stanford, Grand Valley State and Williams defended their titles from a year ago.

Developed as a joint effort between USA TODAY and NACDA, the Sports Academy Directors' Cup program is the only national awards program to recognize NCAA and NAIA championship sports for both women's and men's athletics.

Division I
The Division I race will be concluded on June 29, after the NCAA College World Series. However, Stanford University has already clinched the Sports Academy Directors' Cup. It marks an unprecedented 11 consecutive Directors' Cup. Points and placements do not reflect any of the baseball results.

Without the inclusion of baseball, the Cardinal currently have 1,209.25 points (to date), surpassing runner-up UCLA by 135.25 points. Stanford won its 11th straight Directors' Cup with national championships in women's volleyball and women's tennis and was the runner-up in men's water polo and men's swimming. The Cardinal placed eight additional teams in the top 10.

Stanford teams placing in the top 10 were women's cross country (5th), women's basketball (5th), women's swimming (5th), women's outdoor track and field (5th), men's cross country (6th), men's gymnastics (7th), men's indoor track and field (7th) and softball (9th). The Cardinal recorded points in the maximum of 10 women's and 10 men's sports. Stanford averaged 60 points per sport.

Currently in second place is UCLA with 1,074 points, with national titles in women and men's water polo and men's tennis and runner-up finishes in women's soccer and golf and men's volleyball. Rounding out the current top five are the University of Michigan in third with 1,039.25 points, Duke University in fourth with 1,021.25 points and the University of Texas in fifth with 975 points.

Division II
Grand Valley State defended its title from last year with 801 points, 194 points ahead of the runner-up, University of Nebraska Omaha.

Led by their runner-up finish in women's golf, the Lakers sealed the Sports Academy Directors' Cup win with five additional top 10 finishes in women's cross country (4th), baseball (4th), football (5th), women's basketball (5th) and men's cross country (6th). The Lakers also placed 14th in women's swimming, 16th in women's indoor track and field, 17th in women's volleyball and tennis, 18th in men's indoor track and field, 21st in men's golf and 32nd in men's tennis. Grand Valley State scored points in six men's and the maximum of seven women's sports. The Lakers averaged 62 points per sport.

Rounding out the top five in the standings were the University of Nebraska Omaha in second with 607 points; California State University Chico, third with 588.5 points; University of North Dakota, fourth with 584 points; and California State University Bakersfield, in fifth with 561 points.

Division III
Williams College won its ninth Sports Academy Directors' Cup in the last 10 years and topped the 1,000-point mark for the third consecutive year. The Ephs recorded 1,068.25 points, 168.25 points ahead of runner-up Middlebury University (Vt.).

Williams was the national champion in women's cross country. Eleven additional teams recorded top 10 finishes: women's swimming (4th), women's indoor track and field (4th), men's swimming and diving (4th), women's volleyball (5th), women's rowing (5th), men's soccer (5th), men's tennis (5th), softball (7th), women's field hockey (9th) and women's tennis (9th). The Ephs also placed 11th in men's outdoor track and field, 12th in wrestling, 14th in skiing, 17th in women's soccer and 22nd in men's golf. Williams scored in eight men's and the maximum of nine women's sports.

Rounding out the top five were Middlebury University (Vt.) in second with 900 points; Washington University (Mo.), in third place with 675.75 points; Trinity University (Tex.), in fourth with 672 points; and the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point, in fifth place with 646.75 points.

NAIA
Azusa Pacific University (Calif.), which has perennially finished in the top five and was last year's runner-up, has won its first Sports Academy Directors' Cup. Asuza Pacific posted 881 points, 182 points ahead of runner-up Lindenwood University (Mo.).

The Cougars won the national championship in men's tennis and posted a runner-up finish in men's Division I basketball. Additionally, Azusa Pacific posted nine other top 10 finishes: women's tennis (3rd), football (3rd), women's indoor track and field (4th), men's indoor track and field (4th), women's cross country (5th), men's cross country (5th), men's soccer (5th), women's soccer (9th) and women's Division I basketball (9th). The Cougars also placed 54th in women's volleyball. Azusa Pacific scored in the maximum of six women's and six men's sports and averaged 73 points per sport.

Rounding out the top five were Lindenwood University in second place with 699 points; Simon Fraser University (B.C.), in third place with 684 points; Point Loma Nazarene University (Calif.), fourth with 618 points; and the University of Mary (N.D.), fifth with 572.75 points.

For a breakdown of results by division, please select one of the following links:
Division I
Release
Standings

Division II
Release
Standings

Division III
Release
Standings

NAIA
Release
Standings

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