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ALL NACDA MEMBERS/SELECTED BREAKOUTS
ALCOHOL AND DATE RAPE EDUCATION FOR STUDENT-ATHLETES
(Monday, June 7 --10:15-11:30 a.m.)

Bob Dinaberg:

Good morning. I would like to introduce our speaker this morning, Ron Heitzinger. Ron is the executive director of Heitzinger & Associates. He's a former basketball player at Wisconsin. Ron's twin brother Don, developed the student- athletic assistance program which is currently being used in high schools, colleges and universities throughout the country . His background in clinical treatment gave him the base for establishing this program with the main emphasis being on substance abuse, education for athletes and for coaches. Ron, who currently lives right here in San Diego, has served as a consultant for hundreds of colleges and universities, several professional teams and for NACDA. He also appeared as an expert witness on drug testing litigation in the famous Stanford/NCAA case. His claim to fame this week is that he's featured in the best seller Michael and Me. His important topic for today is Alcohol And Date Rape For Student-Athletes. May I present to you, Ron Heitzinger.

Ron Heitzinger:

Thank you, Bob. Before I begin, I want to give you a little more background on how I arrived at this talk today and this topic. Many of you have seen my work in the past and you know that in the 80's we came out with the student- athletes' assistance motto, which is incorporated in hundreds of school systems throughout the country. Back in 1989, the NCAA did a study of all types of drug education and/or programs relating to health and wellness with student-athletes and found that this was by far the best program. Many of the programs that you're seeing are spin-offs of that concept.

Another thing that happened in 1989 was the Drug Free Schools Act, mandating that colleges have to put together information on these topics; it suffices for what the government also sees you doing. If you'd look at the 1989 Drug Free Schools Act, it mandates you to basically do three things. All three of these things should be evaluated yearly in terms of what you're doing. First of all, is policies and procedures specific to your athletes on substance abuse. Also, incorporate it with team rules. Secondly, drug education programs should be not only for students of your college, but also, what is labeled by the government as special populations, i.e., athletes. Third, is the process referral for help, both internal and external.

In doing those three things, you don't only satisfy the federal government, you also satisfy all of the goals of the student assistance program. When we originated putting in student assistance programs, we visited many of the colleges. We incorporated four-and two-day training for what was designed to be teams. Many of you have gone through those trainings. When I moved to California, back in 1987, Bob, representing the California community colleges, had me represent them at three, two-day workshops. We've set up 48 of these programs in 106 community colleges. The program is something that you'll see in your local high schools.

Many of the topics that can be used in a student assistance program are interchangeable. I worked six years on staff at the University of Wisconsin. I worked with all of their athletes. My contract meant that I would meet with all of their teams twice a year each semester minimum. We would then choose a variety of topics that we thought would be important. Understandingly, as the faddish topics keep creeping up in our society, it's hard to keep up. With the educational process in place, you can adapt any topic.

Our first goals in the early SO's were to deal specifically with knowledge on alcohol and drugs. I worked for seven years with the Seattle Mariners in the SO's and, without doubt, the cocaine situation was as real as was reported in the papers. In our original manuals, we never included steroids because in the early SO's, it wasn't a type of drug to deal with. In the early SO's, we began to see the designer drugs so, we knew that every year, you had to develop a process to handle these topics in a way that would be educational to your student-athletes and develop a process of referral for help. Many colleges around the country attempt fairly good approaches to education. They do not have adequate follow-up as to what needs to be done either internally or externally for help.

When I moved to San Diego, I was hired by San Diego State to help set up their program. I meet with all of their teams twice a year .Two years ago, we had a situation at San Diego State where one of our athletes was date raped. As soon as a topic like that comes up, we search for educational materials to help us in that process. Unbeknownst to me at the time, a film was being distributed at San Diego State for all of the fraternities and sororities to look at on the topic of alcohol and date rape. It made an excellent transfer for student-athletes in captured populations like fraternities and sororities. You will see that film this morning. My goal is to speak to you for 15 minutes, have you see the film for about 30 minutes and then open up the floor.

I want to outline two or three key issues about this film. Watch the film. We'll then dissect it and show you how to use this film with your student-athletes. First of all, the film is put out by FMX. That's what I can tell you. I will not give out phone numbers. You can look at your local library or in your own college library and they will have documentation on the film. The title of the film is "Finding Out" by FMX. At the end of this session today, if anyone wants to come up and get more information about this film, I'll give it to you. We don't want to give you a film as a marketing ploy, but more as a tool to use with your student-athletes. Secondly, the film comes in edited and unedited versions. I have brought the unedited version for many reasons. The first year we began to show this film, we showed the edited version. The kids laughed at it. There are five or six parts in the film where the language is for a college-age student, maybe not for parents, etc. We also thought we needed the unedited version to show the reality of the film. The second part of the film is 30 minutes. We use it as not just a tool. Our sessions are one hour and 15 minutes long. We then go through a process of discussing the film.

The film has a midwest flavor to it because of snow. It goes into alcohol abuse situations, namely four major topic Iareas. One is date rape. I want you to view this film and see what other topics you see in it. We'll then discuss this film.

For people who are taking notes, we see this as a six-step process with your athletes. Before we get into those six steps, I'd like to tell you how to present it. Always do it with all of your teams separately. Don't show this film in mass. When I did it with over 20-some colleges, I was doing four or five of these shows each day with each of the teams separately. Try not to mix males and females together when you show this film.

Stage one is identified as the initial impressions -is this real? After the film is shown and the lights come one, I literally ask that group of athletes that question. You'll be surprised the feedback you'll get. The feedback from your students will show you two things. They'll show you that this film represents adults with a severe drinking problem. We see this as an issue that goes across the board, not only with your athletes, but with your staff.

Many of our clients know that we subscribe to three basic rules. One of those rules is that there is no alcohol use on the road when representing your team or institution. You, as a school, should have a deep departmental policy on that. Make it an all-team rule and not a departmental rule. No use of alcohol on the road, which now shows you why when we start talking about alcohol, we can start to get referrals on that topic.

Stage two in presenting the film goes back to the first part of the film. The topic for step two is legal. I initiate this discussion by asking the group how many people honestly thought the black man was going to get into an accident? I did. After discussing this with the people who put this film together, they did that on purpose. Because nine out of every 10 people who go out and drink too much do make it home. Then it's in their head that they can do it again. Your chance of being arrested in the United States after 8:00 p.m., legally drunk is one in 1,200. When I quote that to student- athletes across the country, what do you think is their first reaction? They're great odds. Over the last 12 years, in working with colleges around the country, I average 14 criminal arrests per year. As many of you know, everyone of the people who were arrested had something to drink prior. That's normal. Now you can begin to see why a film like this one needs to be discussed.

Under the part where it says legal, every educator or college administrator should have put together a packet on the five key laws that affect the college-age athlete: (I) Drunk driving; (2) under age drinking; (3) supplying to a minor; (4) fake I.D; and (5) open container law. As we discuss this part of the film with the athletes, we use the example of the student in the film who made it home and we discuss how many laws he broke on his way --under age drinking, fake I.D., drunk driving. When you look at just his scenario alone, we haven't even gotten to solitary drinking and the family illness that was represented through the film. That's another discussion we could lead to. Just the legal aspect alone, covers those five topics.

We've gone into areas and sat down with campus and local police and talked realistically about what happens when a college student gets arrested for one of those five reasons and how are they treated. Now, you see why we have to look and take it to the next step.

Stage three on the film is the safety .First question. How many people here knew about White Lightning? One ounce is equivalent to 3.1 bottles of beer. There are many beer drinking games on our campuses and they create abuse. Five ounces of White Lightning with five ounces of Hawaiian Punch is tasteless. It is also the equivalent of drinking 14.1 bottles of beer. I've seen football players weighing 260-270 pounds pass out after drinking two shots of White Lightning. As we talk about the safety element, the first part of safety are beer drinking games that are tolerated by teams or many initiations into fraternities or sororities.

The second part is a question back to you. As you watched the film, what was good about the picture of a man passed out? What was good about that picture? Nothing. Now, we look at a safety issue. Many freshmen in college will be drinking at parties where they will literally pass out. Now, it becomes a team or a friend issue to make sure there's not another negative because of that. A person who is put on their back in a bed or in a car in that condition will vomit. I worked eight years at a hospital and I've seen it many times. You have to be on your stomach or on your side, not on your back. In fact, there have been rock stars who died because of this same scenario. Safety issue is defmitely tied up with this.

Step number four is labeled judgement. In the film, we saw the individual who just wanted to climb the stairs to look at the girl in the window. Zero to three drinks in your system interfere with your inhibitions. Three to six drinks, no matter what your body size is, will affect your balance. More than six drinks at anyone setting will affect the central nervous system. Many studies have proven that if you drink alcohol 48 hours before you compete in a sporting event, muscle strength, eye coordination and depth perception go down. We have documented proof of that happening. Many athletes wonder why it's inappropriate to drink. This documentation alone should prove that to them. If they have a football game on a Saturday and they are drinking at all on a Thursday or Friday, performance goes down. In a team discussion, we'll see that now it's not a we against them situation, it's a them monitoring them. They should be looking at friends of theirs and knowing that there's a 48-hour carryover. , I can prove to you how it works. You go back and evaluate your Monday practices. That's the 48-hour rule carried over from Saturday night. Now you'll see the carry over in terms of performances. Most college athletes who are intelligent start to see now that if it applies to playing, it also has to apply to practice. When you give your kids permission to drink or think because they reach a certain age, are you still looking at their commitment to the team?

Part five is the date rape issue. I've shown this film over 100 times to college athletes in the last two years. I've actually seen cheering during sections of this film by male athletes. I've seen women cry at the same scenes. You have women who have gone through this scenario and who have not labeled this as date rape. As I travel around the country and speak to campus police, one of the fIrst things I ask is what happens when a girl approached you with a date rape? What would be your first question? Nine out of 10 times, the first question by a campus policeman centers around whether or not they drank. Then the real liability comes in. Which means, as we discuss this with male athletes, they're laughing. If you're drunk on a date, you're legal responsibility seems to improve. If you're a female and you go out drinking with a date, your chances diminish. When we look at that as a discussion, that reality has to be brought to the floor to be discussed.

Stage six, which is the last stage, are spin-offs, the many what-ifs of legalities tied up with dating, sex and the outcome. Why do we present this film as better than some of the others? We made the analogy that a fraternity house is similar to a team at times. Behavior in fraternity houses and on teams seem to duplicate themselves once people get in mass. That's why we use this crossover. You could be set up at a party situation and all of a sudden things start to spin out of control. If you are intending to use this film with your student-athletes next year, plan four one hour and 15 minutes. One hour for the text and 15 minutes for the follow-up.

I would like to dissect those six stages with you, the audience. I would like your initial impressions about the film, good or bad. Is there any feedback? How many people have used a different film? This is a topic which has to be approached with your student-athletes. Are there any questions on the five laws? Are there any questions dealing with the follow up with the beer drinking games? Are there any questions concerning the outcome? Are there any questions on any of these items? I will be around for awhile if any of you want to see me.